Hande Özdemir1, Filiz Tuna2, Meryem Aktoz3, Nurettin Taştekin2, Derya Demirbağ Kabayel2

1Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Uzunköprü State Hospital, Edirne, Turkey
2Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Trakya University Faculty of Medicine, Edirne, Turkey
3Department of Cardiology, Trakya University Faculty of Medicine, Edirne, Turkey

Keywords: Echocardiography, heart valve disease, joint laxity, women

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of mitral valve prolapse between healthy females with generalized joint hypermobility and healthy controls.

Patients and methods: This observational, cross-sectional, controlled study included female individuals with generalized joint hypermobility (n=39, mean age: 20.5±1.1 years; range, 19 to 23 years) and healthy controls (n=42, mean age: 20.6±1.2 years; range, 18 to 23 years) between July 2017 and November 2017. The generalized joint hypermobility consisted of women with a Beighton score of ≥4, while the control group consisted of women with a Beighton score of ≤3. Echocardiography was performed to all participants. Mitral valve prolapse was defined as having single or bileaflet prolapse of at least 2 mm beyond the long-axis annular plane with or without mitral leaflet thickening.

Results: No significant difference was found in the age, height, body weight, and body mass index between the groups (p>0.05). The median Beighton score was 5 in the generalized joint hypermobility group and 2 in the control group. No mitral valve prolapse was detected in those with generalized joint hypermobility, while non-classical mitral valve prolapse was observed in one participant in the control group, indicating no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05).

Conclusion: Our study results suggest that the frequency of mitral valve prolapse is comparable between the women with generalized joint hypermobility and healthy controls. Based on these results, routine assessment of mitral valve prolapse is not recommended in this population.